But the agreement reached in Malta contains a few words – such as `quotas` and `compulsory` – which have caused problems in the past. It could also prove controversial because it repeatedly involves asylum seekers and migrants rather than refugees, which could open up the system to people less likely to be granted international protection for reasons such as persecution or war. The debate on migration has remained stalled as EU countries struggled to find consensus on reforming an asylum policy whose failure to cope with the influx of migrants after the 2015 crisis led five member states to re-establish internal border controls. Malta says it is unable to accommodate migrants arriving on the small Mediterranean island, many of whom are departing from war-torn Libya. In addition to capacity issues, Maltese ports have been closed for more than two months due to the persistence of the COVID-19 pandemic.  She added that the limited agreement reached on Monday aims to ensure that rescue vessels „will immediately find refuge, thus avoiding additional difficulties for migrants and ensuring a swift relocation of asylum seekers on a voluntary basis to other member states”. Participating countries said details would be shared with other EU countries ahead of the EU ministerial meeting on 8 October. Italian Interior Minister Luciana Lamorgese said the exact percentage of rescued migrants that each country would approve would depend on how many EU members ultimately participate in the system. Malta`s abusive practices are part of wider efforts by member states and EU institutions to relocate control of the central Mediterranean to Libya so that EU-backed Libyan authorities can intercept refugees and migrants at sea before reaching Europe. On 23 September 2019, an informal „mini-summit” was held in Malta to find a solution to the long-standing controversy around the search and recovery (SaR), disembarkation and relocation of migrants in the Mediterranean, which has become a hot political topic since the summer of 2018. He summoned the Interior Ministers of Italy and Malta, in solidarity and sharing responsibilities fairly, Germany and France, who seemed ready to lend their support in this regard, representatives of the European Commission and Finland holding the Presidency of the Council. . . .