(a) to search, collect and remove State property at any reasonable time and without unreasonable prejudice; and a buyer who travels to land in accordance with section 5 shall exempt the State from all claims for unreasonable damage caused by the sending, search, collection or removal of surplus war materials. In all civil or criminal proceedings where the question of ownership of surplus war materials arises, the surplus of war is considered to be the absolute property of the State for all purposes, until proven otherwise. A person who, within the scope of the powers conferred by this Act, searches, collects and removes surplus war material shall not be liable for damages that are not caused as unreasonable damage in the exercise of those powers. (a) to search, collect and remove, at any reasonable time and after written notification from the occupant of the land, at least seven days after the surplus of material from the country of war, in which he has acquired a right, title or interest giving it to his possession; and the Ramos Rusk deal reduced the duration of the contract to 25 years from this year. 1979 The 1979 MBA Review led to the formal control of the Philippines of Clark and Subic. That`s how there are Philippine military installations with American installations in them. It also provided that each base would be under a Philippine base commander; the Philippine flag to fly individually in the bases; the Philippine government should provide security along the range of the bases; and the revision of the agreements every five years from 1979 on. In 1988, an agreement was signed to revise Article XIII of the Treaty, under which the United States will waive exclusive jurisdiction over alternative offences and the creation of a joint criminal commission. September 16, 1966 The federal government may transfer surplus real and personal property to legitimate airport sponsors for airport purposes. These include military bases closed under the Base Welfare and Closure Act (BRAC). A law intended to facilitate the collection of war materials and for other purposes. OVERVIEW WHAT IS MBA What is MBA? The Military Base Agreement of 1947 (MBA) is a joint agreement between the Philippines and the United States, signed on March 16, 1947.

This treaty officially allowed the United States to build, maintain, and operate air and naval bases in the country. The Surplus Property Board (SPB) was briefly responsible for the disposal of $90 billion of surplus war property held by the U.S. government during the final year of World War II. [1] Created by the Surplus Property Act of 1944,[2] the board of directors operated for less than nine months before being replaced by a thinner agency. (b) in arrears with the agreement, as found in arbitration proceedings. In all civil proceedings involving the State and in all criminal proceedings where the question arises as to whether or not property is surplus war material, property is considered, until proven otherwise, to be a surplus of war for all purposes. The objectives of the Surplus Property Act were not limited to the distribution of surplus assets; These include the restoration of independent free enterprise, the strengthening of the competitive position of new and small entrepreneurs and family farmers, and the widespread and non-monopolistic use of State property. [3] Years of rationing during the war had created a surplus on many types of assets that the government had accumulated.

[7] This demand has been exacerbated by the return of millions of Veterans to civilian life. However, the political responsibilities of the board of directors have been made difficult by the potential impact of selling too many surplus assets at a reduced price. . . . .